Facts on dating and relationships Camchats free

"It's Not You, It's the Dishes" coauthor Paula Szuchman recommends a system where each person specializes in the chores they're best at."If you really are better at the dishes than remembering to call the in-laws, then that should be your job," she writes.Recent research from the University of Connecticut suggests that a person who is on their spouse is more likely to be unfaithful — and that's especially true for a man who relies financially on a woman.Interestingly, when women are the breadwinners, they're less likely to cheat.The Atlantic's Megan Garber reports: "A one-year discrepancy in a couple's ages, the study found, makes them 3 percent more likely to divorce (when compared to their same-aged counterparts); a 5-year difference, however, makes them 18 percent more likely to split up.And a 10-year difference makes them 39 percent more likely." In multiple studies, couples that actively celebrated good news (rather than actively or passively dismissed it) have had a higher rate of relationship well-being.

Helen Fisher, a psychologist and relationship expert, told Business Insider that it's unclear when exactly the "in love" feeling starts to fade, but it does so "for good evolutionary reasons," she said, because "it's very metabolically expensive to spend an awful lot of time just focusing on just one person in that high-anxiety state." Back in the 1950s and '60s, Canadian psychologist Eric Berne introduced a three-tiered model for understanding a person's identity. Controlling for premarital happiness, the study concluded that marriage leads to increased well-being — and it does so much more for those who have a close friendship with their spouses.Perhaps it would help to turn to the scientific research, which has pinpointed specific factors that can make or break a romantic relationship.Below, we've rounded up 15 nontrivial things you might want to keep in mind before hiring a wedding planner.A 2009 study led by researchers at the University of Denver found that most couples moved in for other reasons besides test-driving their relationship before marriage.But couples who did report testing the relationship were more likely to experience a number of negative emotions.

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